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Policy & Research Forum Event

June 17, 2010

 

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How to improve our nation's response to catastrophe

June 25, 2010

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Overview

The George Washington University Homeland Security Policy Institute (HSPI) hosted Dr. Paul Stockton, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense and Americas’ Security Affairs, for a Policy & Research Forum titled “Strengthening Unity of Effort: Challenges and New Directions.”  Frank Cilluffo, HSPI’s Director, moderated the roundtable discussion.Paul Stockton

Stockton addressed how Defense Department (DoD) resources and personnel could be prepared to respond to gubernatorial requests during a disaster affecting more than one state.  Of primary importance, he argued, would be unity of effort in support of civilian authorities – state and local.  To achieve this, Stockton stated three things were necessary:  increasing the flow of federal capabilities into disaster areas, establishing chains of command and control a priori, and ensuring that federal forces are responsive to guidance from state authorities.  To achieve these three goals, Stockton pressed for an increase in the sharing of disaster response plans between federal and state governments.  “When I look at state plans and regional plans, I want to know, what have governors identified as potential gaps in state capabilities to respond to catastrophes in their state – the most likely catastrophes in their states.  What are those likely areas in which they might actually request federal military assistance?” said Stockton.    

Cilluffo began the roundtable discussion by noting the important conceptual differences that exist between homeland security and homeland defense, and the effects such differences have on policy.  “I’d be curious as to how you define where homeland security ends and homeland defense begins.  Because of the need to plan for the catastrophic and the need to meet the gap that exists between the roles and missions of DHS [Department of Homeland Security] and DoD, this is an important question,” said Cilluffo.  Stockton responded by referring to the Defense Department’s role in territorial defense, including its role in ensuring that weapons of mass destruction are not smuggled into the United States.  Yet, Stockton was quick to point out that DHS has primary responsibility for disaster response.  DoD’s role, he said, is one of support.  Audience members raised questions about:  the procedures by which the states would request military support, decisions regarding resource allocation, and the organization and equipping of National Guard forces.

 

Featured Speaker:

Paul N. Stockton, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense and Americas’ Security Affairs

 

Speaker Biography

Paul N. Stockton, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense and Americas’ Security Affairs.

Paul N. Stockton was nominated by President Barack Obama to be the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense and Americas’ Security Affairs on April 28, 2009, and confirmed by the Senate on May 18, 2009. In this position, he is responsible for the supervision of homeland defense activities, defense support of civil authorities, and Western Hemisphere security affairs for the Department of Defense.

Assistant Secretary Stockton received a bachelor's degree from Dartmouth College in 1976 and a doctorate in government from Harvard in 1986. From 1986-1989, Assistant Secretary Stockton served as legislative assistant to Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan, advising the senator on defense, intelligence, counter-narcotics policy, and served as the senator’s personal representative to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. From 1989 – 1990, Assistant Secretary Stockton was awarded a Postdoctoral Fellowship by the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University. During his graduate studies at Harvard, he served as a research associate at the International Institute for Strategic Studies in London.

Assistant Secretary Stockton joined the faculty of the Naval Postgraduate School in August 1990 as assistant professor in the Department of National Security Affairs. From 1995 until 2000, he served as Director of the Center for Civil-Military Relations, assisting over 80 nations to strengthen democratic control over their security forces and deepen security cooperation with the United States. In 2000, he founded and served as the acting dean of the School of International Graduate Studies. He was appointed Associate Provost for Institutional Development in 2001. From 2002 – 2006, Assistant Secretary Stockton served as Director, Center for Homeland Defense and Security, where he helped develop the curricula to strengthen U. S. all-hazards preparedness at local, state, and Federal levels.

Prior to his confirmation, Assistant Secretary Stockton was a senior research scholar at Stanford University's Center for International Security and Cooperation. His research focused on how U.S. security institutions respond to changes in the threat (including the rise of terrorism), and on the interaction of Congress and the Executive branch in restructuring national security budgets, policies, and institutional arrangements.

Assistant Secretary Stockton is co-editor of Homeland Security, a graduate text to be published by Oxford University Press. He served on the editorial review board of Homeland Security Affairs, a quarterly journal he helped establish in 2005. His research has appeared in Political Science Quarterly, International Security, and Strategic Survey. He is co-editor of Reconstituting America's Defense: America's New National Security Strategy (1992). He has also published an Adelphi Paper and has contributed chapters to a number of books, including James Lindsay and Randall Ripley, eds., U.S. Foreign Policy After the Cold War (1997).

 

Resources

Associated Press. (2010) "States Chafe at DoD Control in Disasters." Military.com

Bowman, Steve, Lawrence Kapp, & Amy Belasco. (2005) "Hurricane Katrina: DOD Disaster Response." Washington, DC: Congressional Research Service

Burkett, Jeffrey. (2008) "Command and Control of Military Forces in the Homeland." Joint Forces Quarterly. Washington, DC: National Defense University

Cilluffo, Frank. (2006) The National Guard and Homeland Defense. Testimony

Department of Defense. (2010) "2010 Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR) Fact Sheet." Arlington, VA: US Department of Defense Public Affairs

Department of Defense. (2010) "Quadrennial Defense Review." Arlington, VA: Office of the Secretary of Defense

Department of Defense. (2010) "Quadrennial Defense Review." Website. Arlington, VA: Office of the Secretary of Defense

Department of Defense. (2009) "Quadrennial Roles and Missions Review 2009." Arlington, VA: Office of the Secretary of Defense

Department of Homeland Security. (2010) "Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources." Website. Washington, DC: Secretary, US Department of Homeland Security

Department of Homeland Security. (2010) "Quadrennial Homeland Security Review (QHSR)." Washington, DC: Secretary, US Department of Homeland Security

Department of Homeland Security. (2010) "Quadrennial Homeland Security Review (QHSR)." Website. Washington, DC: Secretary, US Department of Homeland Security

HSPI Regionalization Task Force. (2006) "Regionalizing Homeland Security: Unifying National Preparedness and Response." Washington, DC: HSPI

Hsu, Spencer. (2009) "Agencies Clash on Military's Border Role." Washington, DC: The Washington Post

Hsu, Spencer & Ann Scott Tyson. (2008) "Pentagon to Detail Troops to Bolster Domestic Security." Washington, DC: The Washington Post

Kaniewski, Daniel. (2009) Post Katrina Emergency Management Reform Act of 2006 Implementation: An Examination of FEMA's Preparedness and Response Mission. Testimony.

NATO. (2010) "The Euro-Atlantic Disaster Response Coordination Centre." Website. Brussels, Belgium: NATO Headquarters

President Obama. (2010) Executive Order: Establishment of the Council of Governors. Washington, DC: The White House, Office of the Press Secretary

Soucy, Jon. (2010) "DoD relooks at plans for Guard response to capabilities." Arlington, VA: Department of the Army

Special Committee on Homeland Security and Public Safety. (2009) "Army and Air National Guard." Washington, DC: The National Governors Association

Stockton, Paul. (2010) "Unity of Effort: Defining A Partnership Between DoD and State Governors." Interview. Monterey, CA; Center for Homeland Defense & Security

Townsend, Frances. (2010) "Keep the Military Out of the Oil Mess." Blog. The Daily Beast

United States Code, Title 10, Part I - Organization and General Military Powers, Chapter 3. (2009) General Powers and Functions. Washington, DC

United States Code, Title 10, Part I - Organization and General Military Powers, Chapter 15. (2009) Insurrection. Washington, DC

United States Code, Title 18, Part I - Crimes [contains Posse Comitatus Act], Chapter 67 [see §1385]. (2009) Military and the Navy. Washington, DC

United States Code, Title 32 - National Guard, Chapter 9. (2009) Homeland Defense Activities. Washington, DC

The White House. (2006) "The Federal Response to Hurricane Katrina: Lessons Learned." Washington, DC: Executive Office of the President

The White House. (2010) "President Obama Signs Executive Order Establishing Council of Governors." Press Release. Washington, DC: The White House, Office of the Press Secretary

 

About HSPI's Policy & Research Forum Series

HSPI's Policy & Research Forum Series spotlights cutting-edge security policy solutions and innovative research.  The Series is designed to provide thought leaders in the United States and abroad with a uniquely constructive venue in which to discuss current and future security issues and challenges.